Twitter for Business: 9 Community Management Tips

Wendy Kier, The Queen of Twitter, blogs about the need to have a Twitter business strategy that sits in line with your overall marketing goals and objectives, and how random Tweeting does very little in way of attracting new business.

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Build your own ride…

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The ride is, of course, the main attraction and the 3 minutes of thrills and spills you’ve been queuing so long for. And when you get on the ride sometimes you love it and wish it lasted longer, and other times you are very happy that it’s all over with quickly! But was it worth it either way? Was it YOUR ride?

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Taking the chances

I’d like to be able to tell you that everything that happens in business is all very organised and proper and happens as part of a process. And it does—most of the time. But sometimes you have to take chances and see opportunities for what they really are. And sometimes they won’t make perfect sense but you just know they are what you have to do.

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Do it again!

Now I am the world’s worst (or best?) at coming up with new ideas.

I am always excited about the next thing. What I can do that’s new. And I always want to move forward. Keep it going. Bigger, better, bolder, brighter. But actually this can be exactly what not to do in business.

If you have something that works – keep doing it!

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Not everyone is an entrepreneur

If you’re happy to just do your Thing—get paid for it—all is well, but you’re probably not an entrepreneur—just a self-employed, or employed even, Thinger. It’s when you take risks—either the risk of standing out, of doing something differently, of calling yourself a ‘name’, of standing by a process or philosophy that’s yours—then you’re an entrepreneur.

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Give them what they want (but make it what they need)

You should always be listening to your market and offering products and services they want. That’s common business sense. That said, sometimes you may know that what they (your market) ‘want’ is not what they ‘need’. The trick here is a to strike a balance and meet them where they are, then gently ‘steer’ them to where you know lies a better answer.

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