It doesn’t have to be shiny and new

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Having a signature dish or programme gets you noticed and remembered. If you are changing your recipe all the time then how do we know what your brilliant Thing is? Being in your spotlight means being consistent and having a clear signature that we can see. If you are chopping and changing all the time it’s confusing for us and it’s diluting your brilliance.

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Buying Time

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Buying Time is a concept that works really well if you’re half Thinging and half doing what you’re good at right now. Buying Time also works really well if you’re not doing your Thing yet (even if you don’t know what it is) and instead you’re stuck getting paid for something you’re just good at. Buying Time is also something I do so I can take time off from my Thing and do something else (holiday, anyone?).

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Getting to Zero

When you do your Thing are you helping people get from a ‘negative’ place to ‘zero’—that place of neutrality where everything is ‘normal’?

Marketing to a person or business who is in negative place and telling the them you can take them to amazingly positive place can seem like a huge—and unbelievable—step. But marketing to a person who is in negative place and telling them you can get them to ‘zero’ is not.

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How many times does it take?

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Marketing (folk?)law says you need to ‘touch’ a prospect 7 times before they will respond. By ‘touch’ here be clear that I mean a message touch-point—so an email, Facebook post, a video, a talk, a letter, etc. There are exceptions to every rule as sometimes you can get a response the very first time someone sees you—I know I’ve had this happen when I’ve spoken at an event or met someone at networking. It’s more likely the ‘one touch’ conversions happens in person but it’s not always the case.

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You’re better than you think you are

I’m good at this. Maybe you’re good at this too? Thinking you’re ‘not that good’ at things and underestimating your talent and value. But the chances are you are good, or at the very least ‘good enough’.

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Buying a course doesn’t make it happen

Now, hands up, I’ve got a very good selection of online courses in my collection of which a fair few (OK, pretty much all of them) haven’t been totally completed. Sometimes I buy them when they’re on special as I’ll ‘need them later’ (which is sometimes true), or I buy them as it’s something I think I ‘should be doing’ (and often actually I don’t do…). That is not to say I never log in to online courses and follow the content–as I do. And sometimes I’m even a really good student–watching every class, asking questions and getting the most from the content. But the point is always that the courses themselves don’t fix anything on their own–you have to do the work.

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