What I know about flow

I would love to tell you that I wake up in ‘full flow’ every single day and do my Thing with no distractions, interruptions or procrastination on my part. I would love to tell you that–except, of course, it’s not true.

What is true is that I know what to do, or at least what usually ‘helps’, to shift me into flow mode. It’s not always the same set of actions, but there are a few things I can choose from.

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Ask questions. A lot of questions…

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If you’re not sure about your Thing, ask yourself these great Thing-finding questions, questions to work out your process or philosophy, questions to help you work out your best marketing, and yet more questions…

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Listening

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When you’re busy doing your Thing it’s important to listen… listen to you, listen to your clients, listen to the market, listen to your body.

When you are listening you’ll do your Thing in the best way you can.

You know you are the best person to learn from…

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Ready, Steady, Cook (your products & services)

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Here’s how you use your signature system to work out your products, services and programs.

You don’t use the entire cupboard of ingredients—you play like “Ready Steady Cook” and use the 5 (or 3 or 7) key favourite ingredients your clients need that you have in your signature system.

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Pace yourself (and get good at the 1 thing that makes all the difference)

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When you work out your Thing, it’s very tempting to then run at 100 miles an hour and try and get everything done at once. You want the website, the Facebook followers, the big list, the speaking gigs, the PR, the online programme–the lot. But what you might spot missing from that list is clients (and therefore cash).

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Rehearsing and the real thing

I’m not a good rehearser. I can ‘run through’ things, but to do an ‘as perfect’ performance without an audience I find really tough. That’s not to say I don’t prepare–and I don’t recommend you don’t either–but be OK that the ‘first time’ might be the first time.

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